Bottling day and tasting notes: Molasses Stout

Standard bottling process, you know how it goes. Sanitize everything, shoo the Morale Octopus off the fermenter, and get busy.

I’m really happy with the Molasses Stout, but you know what I need about a ton more of? MOLASSES. I thought I was overdoing it, but I didn’t even scratch the surface of overdoing it. I may have barely begun to simply do it, and overdoing it will require a tanker truck.

Tasting notes:

Really, really good. I love this beer. Hoppier than expected, but less spicy and less molasses-y. Good balance, will probably be especially super after a few months in the bottle mellow the hops out. There’s a little bit of barleywine-type raisin fruitiness. It’s also pretty strong. As usual I have no idea what the gravity or ABV are, but a test glass suggests that this batch is comfortably in the imperial range.

Recipe notes:

I would happily make this beer again, unaltered. But for a gingerbread molasses stout of the sort I originally intended, the recipe needs about half the hops–and twice the molasses, lactose, and spice mix (leaving juniper at original amount). 8 oz of lactose and nearly a gallon of molasses for a 5-gal batch. That sounds absolutely ridiculous. I’m going to do it anyway–but probably as a 1-gal test run first.

Here’s a look at the actual beer, just after bottling. Looking forward to seeing what kind of head it ends up with once it’s done.

Advertisements
Tagged , ,

3 thoughts on “Bottling day and tasting notes: Molasses Stout

  1. otownmommy says:

    mmmm love the idea of gingerbread. what about using the molasses in secondary fermentation to keep more of the flavours?

    • brewingape says:

      I might have to try that. I’d be worried that the molasses would dissolve poorly in cool wort and settle to the bottom, though.

      (as a side note, this made me curious about whether heating molasses diminishes its flavor appreciably and mostly I found scientific papers evaluating volatile compounds in molasses for their potential to attract houseflies. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2621.1971.tb03353.x/abstract . Neat!)

      • otownmommy says:

        hmmm- good point. maybe mix it as a slurry with a few cups of hot kettled water to dilute it but retain flavours. houseflies….?… i thought you attract the most house flies with honey 😉 happy brewing- i may look into this more as a seasonal beer to go along with our pumpkin ale next fall.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: